Categories

Powered by TypePad

« Facebook: Kanji Box | Main | New General Use Kanji from 2010 »

January 10, 2008

Comments

Alex

I'm torn by the chic factor of having a domain name in Japanese, and the complete non-utility of it for anyone outside of Japan.

勝利の説明書.日本 would be so cool instead of just victorymanual.com, but there's no way my friends and family back in the States could navigate their way to that!

claytonian

ultimately, I think this is a bad idea. It's only going to erect barriers in the last place that needs them.

Will

I'm guessing that the niche market in Japan will be seniors and the like - lots of them on the horizon. Those over the age of sixty at the moment would much prefer to deal only with kanji. Similarly for Arabic pages - the people with the Arabic extensions won't be aiming at the whole world - just the Arab speaking market.

On the plus side, think of the business opportunities - get paid to look up domains that people in Eigoken can't read!

Bruce Smith

It's a backwards step.

Gabuchan

I think this is an awesome idea for a specific target you are trying to reach with a website. You want your site to stand out, then this is it. Why is this a bad thing?

goodmachine

its awesome and it sucks at the same time because it will hasten the fracturing of the net. Honestly ICANN had no choice china has been threatening to do it on their own and that would have caused tonnes of TLD problems so a formal structure is palatable IMHO

Jake

Interesting stuff. I actually read an article that said this will be replacing the .jp domains. Any idea if that is true? I was thinking about registering a .jp domain, but if current .jp domains will be changed to .日本 domains, I don't really see the point.

Jordan

Very interesting. I can see how one would take this as nationalizing cyberspace, but its already been nationalized for the longest time anyways. For that matter, I don't think this will change the game that much. For example, people who can't speak Arabic usually don't go to Arabic speaking sites anyways. I think that the end of the monopoly roman characters have had on urls and domains should have been seen as inevitable.

The comments to this entry are closed.

Search this site



Ads by Google

Stats


Analytics